PAINTINGS > FOOL'S GOLD

In 1797, at the close of George Washington’s presidency, the United States was a young country hungry for patriotic art that celebrated its birth. Three years later, the White House acquisition of Gilbert Stuart’s iconic full-length portrait of Washington enshrined him in the public eye as our founding father, and established a precedent that art procured for the White House collection would function as an historical record lauding American ideals and individual accomplishments. Despite two centuries of presidents, artists and donors, honoring history—both national and individual—has persisted as the curatorial priority.

Fool's Gold is composed of two bodies of work within the exhibition. First, The Erasures which are drawn strictly from The White House Art Collection and second, my usual text based works which are also sourced from The White House, in addition to prominent American painting held within prestigious museum collections nationwide. In both bodies of work, each are a reflection of how I see American politics in our current, divided country.

The Erasures is a collection of historical paintings meticulously reproduced by hand, but instead of annotating the works with current texting acronyms and digital shorthand, the subjects are obscured by a hand-painted checkerboard pattern. Familiar to Adobe Photoshop users—web and graphic designers, advertisers and others who shape public opinion—the gray and white motif signifies the software’s ‘eraser’ tool has removed the underlying image.

The superimposed editing marks on The Erasure paintings vary from random, visceral swipes covering part of the subject or a small part of the work, to structured, rectilinear shapes verging on overtaking the underlying image completely. Whether erasure is portrayed as a temperamental outburst, or a methodically executed plan, the resulting obliteration is much the same. It is only in the series titles that we detect resistance to such a redaction of history.

The underlying works chosen for this series originally served as testaments of those who came before us and the indelible mark they left on the world, in a very short time, not so long ago. In an era where the internet makes everyone a publisher, and digital editing tools bestow the power to create realities out of pixels, The Erasures forces us to examine our assumptions regarding the longevity of individual influence and institutions, thus raising enormous questions concerning the fragility of legacy.

If images, and by implication, legacy can be altered so easily, can one person actually erase the impact of another? Can recent progress be erased more easily than ideals fought for and won long ago? If individual legacy can be expunged, how enduring are the concepts that spawned this country? How will the current day be recorded, judged and preserved when anyone can create, or re-create, his or her own reality with a keystroke, or a mouse-swipe, or a dead-of-night tweet?

The text used in the text paintings are sourced from social media (typically Twitter) from third parties and are supporters of either the left side of the political spectrum, or the right. To keep the text paintings pure and to show they are a reflection of the American people, I do not use my own text as I feel it would be too contrived. While The Erasures shows the removal of a democracy, the text paintings are from the very people that live within that democracy and how obscure both sides of the isle have become by following an ideal based on fear and not by facts.

NOTE: All works are physical paintings, NOT digital and/or photoshopped images.

Washington Crossing The Delaware: Critical Drinking
acrylic on canvas
62 x 96 in (157 x 244 cm)
2019
Laughing On The Inside: Miss Frances Lee
acrylic on canvas
42 x 32 in (107 x 81 cm)
2019
George Washington: You Tried
acrylic on canvas
42 x 32 in (107 x 81 cm)
2019
Evening Glow At Lake Louise: Hey Siri, How Do I Leave The Planet?
acrylic on canvas
60 x 84 in (152 x 213 cm)
2019
Follow The Money: Young Robert E. Lee (Based On Money Face Emoji)
acrylic on canvas
26 x 22 in (66 x 56 cm)
2019
Descending Eh: Portrait of Nathaniel Olds
acrylic on canvas
30 x 26 in (76 x 66 cm)
2019
William Sidney Mount Self Portrait: Like, Can You Not?
acrylic on canvas
20 x 16 in (51 x 41 cm)
2019
Portrait of Sarah Allen: Blah Blah Blah
acrylic on canvas
53.5 x 38 in (136 x 97 cm)
2019
Swoon (Abraham Lincoln, Erasure No. 31)
acrylic on canvas
32 x 26 in (81 x 66 cm)
2019
American Purgatory (Benjamin Franklin, Erasure No. 24)
acrylic on canvas
36 x 26 in (91 x 66 cm)
2019
Martha Washington (The Athenaeum Portrait): The Fuck What?
acrylic on canvas
44 x 32 in (112 x 81 cm)
2019
The Last Exit (Valley Of The Yosemite, Erasure No. 27)
acrylic on canvas
36 x 52 in (91 x 132 cm)
2019
Time Never Tells (Niagara Falls, White House Art Collection Erasure No. 4)
acrylic on canvas mounted to birch panel
20 x 30 in. oval (51 x 76 cm)
2018
Study Of A 19th Century Landscape: Oh For Fuck Sake
acrylic on canvas
14 x 18 in (36 x 46 cm)
2019
Abraham Lincoln: Tears Of
acrylic on canvas
18 x 14 in (46 x 36 cm)
2019
We Kind Of Have A History (Benjamin Henry Latrobe, White House Art Collection Erasure No. 2)
acrylic on canvas mounted to birch panel
18 x 16 in. oval (46 x 41 cm)
2018
California Spring: The Fuck?
acrylic on panel
24 inches diameter (61 cm diameter)
2019
Anna Payne Cutts: Blah Blah Blah
acrylic on canvas
18 x 14 in (46 x 36 cm)
2019